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[personal profile] terriko
This is crossposted from Curiousity.ca, my personal maker blog. If you want to link to this post, please use the original link since the formatting there is usually better.

I don’t tend to share work-in-progress shots for a few reasons:


1. I knit a lot on the go, where it’s not too convenient to take pictures.

2. I am really really bad at processing all my photos, and more of them just adds to the laod.

3. I just don’t think of it.


But I did think of it today, and it’s gotten me thinking a bit about useful general photography tips I need to remember when knitting:


Knit photography #1: Be careful of focus and depth of field


I love small depths of field in general photography and beautiful bokeh (aka the blurry bits) and all, but when taking pictures of my knitting, I need to make sure that the focus is where I want to be, and covers enough of the area around where I’m trying to draw the eye:


My very sparkly stitch marker


So here, I’m taking a picture of my pretty little stitch marker, and I’ve only left a small row of knitting in focus.


Since this is a maker blog, I’ll say that I made the stitch marker myself, for values of “made” that include “I bought a bunch of beads that had rings through them and separated them then re-closed the circles.” My project *sparkles* in the sun right now thanks to the beads, which is fun when I’m actually knitting in the sunbeam.


The narrow depth of field actually works well for something that small, but when I’m showing a series of stitches, I have to remember to adjust my photography style so that people can see the stitches well.


That can mean making sure the section is really flat:


Triangle lace stitch thing


Or it can mean just making sure the depth of field is big enough for the area in question:


Sweater Neckline with simple lace holes


Knit photography #2: Yarn has weird light properties


Colour Whorl


When you look up close at yarn, you can usually see that it’s at least a little bit fuzzy. This helps make it warm and soft, but also means it has some weird light properties where it will seriously glow given enough light. This can be awesome, or it can be really irritating, but the important thing to remember is that photographing knit/crocheted fabrics in bright light can be challenging in different ways, and each yarn is going to be a little different.


The extreme contrast isn’t always a bad thing: it can help you showcase lace. In theory. In reality, I always seem to end up with hyper-real photos, or ones with huge dark patches that just don’t look right:


Trying (and failing) to showcase some lace


And the sun is pretty bright already, so even if the yarn didn’t pick up the light so well, it could be a mess:

Demonstration of knitting photography in the sun and why it can be challenging


You can fix these things, of course, with some messing around in lightroom/photoshop, but then you lose out using the extreme contrast to show stitch definition, and you can make the project look a little dull:


Demonstration of knitting photography in the sun and why it can be challenging (2)


I suspect it’s going to take a lot more experimentation before I can quickly snap off a few photos in sunlight! But for now, I’ll be thinking critically about what I do and practicing doing it until I feel like I’ve got the kind of photos I want for matching with my patterns.


And with that, I give you one more photo where I’m proud of the light. This one showcases the rainbow nature of my stitch markers:


Rainbow stitch marker


So pretty!

Date: February 3rd, 2014 10:58 pm (UTC)
altamira16: Tall ship at dusk (Default)
From: [personal profile] altamira16
The yarn that you used is pretty. With the stitches that go in front of the piece to form the large "V" shapes, did you have to use a cabling needle to make that happen?

I am wondering if scanning knitted pieces to show the stitches may be a way to go.

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