software release accomplished!

Jul. 2nd, 2015 05:54 pm
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
I am done, sort of! at least, it shipped!

Cool huh?

I'm so very very very tired and brain-fried! I hope for a good long weekend with some swimming involved!

Dream of spies and leather

Jun. 30th, 2015 10:28 pm
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
My friend Beth was in my dream last night. we were spies. it was pride week in London and we were in full leather and discussing its cultural meanings. I could walk during most of that and then suddenly things shifted and i remembered I had a wheelchair and then i was in it for the rest of the dream and wondered how I could have walked so far in my spying job! We said wry things and slinked around. Things were very industrial.
pleia2: (Default)
[personal profile] pleia2

Super star Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter contributor Paul White recently was reflecting upon his work with the newsletter and noted that he was approaching 100 issues that he’s contributed to. Wow!

That caused me to look at how long I’ve been involved. Back in 2011 the newsletter when on a 6 month hiatus when the former editor had to step down due to obligations elsewhere. After much pleading for the return of the newsletter, I spent a few weeks working with Nathan Handler to improve the scripts used in the release process and doing an analysis of the value of each section of the newsletter in relation to how much work it took to produce each week. The result was a slightly leaner, but hopefully just as valuable newsletter, which now took about 30 minutes for an experienced editor to release rather than 2+ hours. This change was transformational for the team, allowing me to be involved for a whopping 205 consecutive issues.

If you’re not familiar with the newsletter, every week we work to collect news from around our community and the Internet to bring together a snapshot of that week in Ubuntu. It helps people stay up to date with the latest in the world of Ubuntu and the Newsletter archive offers a fascinating glimpse back through history.

But we always need help putting the newsletter together. We especially need people who can take some time out of their weekend to help us write article summaries.

Summary writers. Summary writers receive an email every Friday evening (or early Saturday) US time with a link to the collaborative news links document for the past week which lists all the articles that need 2-3 sentence summaries. These people are vitally important to the newsletter. The time commitment is limited and it is easy to get started with from the first weekend you volunteer. No need to be shy about your writing skills, we have style guidelines to help you on your way and all summaries are reviewed before publishing so it’s easy to improve as you go on.

Interested? Email editor.ubuntu.news@ubuntu.com and we’ll get you added to the list of folks who are emailed each week.

I love working on the newsletter. As I’ve had to reduce my commitment to some volunteer projects I’m working on, I’ve held on to the newsletter because of how valuable and enjoyable I find it. We’re a friendly team and I hope you can join us!

Still just interested in reading? You have several options:

And everyone is welcome to drop by #ubuntu-news on Freenode to chat with us or share links to news we may found valuable for the newsletter.

Originally published at pleia2's blog. You can comment here or there.

Sunday 28 June 2015

Jun. 28th, 2015 09:31 pm
puzzlement: (jelly)
[personal profile] puzzlement
Originally posted at http://puzzling.org.

We’ve had our used moving boxes picked up, and we’ve returned my overdue library books from Glebe. We’ve hung the pictures we haven’t seen in three years because the previous place didn’t have hooks. There’s things we aren’t on top of (at least two lights need electrical work) but on the basics we really are moved in now.

We had our housewarming party last weekend. That and my then-missing photos hard drive motivated the bulk of the box unpacking. I like to occasionally have parties and invite a huge number of people that I know. In lieu of culling the guest list, I give fairly short notice. We live in a short street, which made it easy to invite the new neighbours too. It fell on the solstice. I used to have solstice barbecues up at Balls Head Reserve and heat mulled wine in a pot on the electric barbecues in the dark. Not since V was born. But since the housewarming was on June 21, we made mulled wine in the crockpot and had heated party pies and sausage rolls. The latter used to be a welcome treat on dive boats, served with mugs of instant soup, restoring our body temperature between dives.

The next two weeks are school holidays, which will be less of a contrast for V than they were for us. He’s spending the two weeks in his usual after school care provider, in their full day vacation care program. They do a lot of excursions and activities and generally contribute to the school holiday crowding in public places. We’re visiting my family for a weekend but not otherwise going away because we’re going to the snow in September (if there is snow this year). For a while my life will be mainly house things.

We aren’t far from an adult education centre, so I’d like to enrol in a few courses over the next couple of years. Music, studio photography… And I’m excited about the possibilities of a house I can change over time. The biggest project I can imagine is getting the back courtyard substantially redesigned. There’s a lot of small stuff that can go before that though. I’ve even joined Pinterest to track inspiration; I’m reminded that in my Wikimania keynote in 2012 the issue of women using Pinterest rather than editing Wikipedia came up once or twice, which now seems mostly odd, since one is an encyclopedia and the other is a visual inspiration bookmarking site. Probably my “find interesting pictures of courtyards” moments will not overlap terribly much with my “find sources for recent Australian crimes” moments.

join the fight for racial justice!

Jun. 23rd, 2015 07:31 pm
bokunenjin: (park bench)
[personal profile] bokunenjin
Notice: this post contains a lot of important links. If you are seeing a link-stripped version, e.g., on Facebook, I urge you to view the original post including the links at http://bokunenjin.dreamwidth.org/62030.html

Living somewhat close to Baltimore and claiming to support social justice, I've felt a certain amount of guilt for not taking part in the recent protests. (I do support the protesters; I just didn't carve out the time and energy.) But here's the thing: WHITE GUILT IS USELESS.

Following in the footsteps of Val and Leigh, I'm using some of my economic privilege to fight white supremacy in the wake of racist violence including, but not limited to, last week's Charleston church shooting and—more broadly—racial profiling, police brutality, mass incarceration of African-Americans, and the militarization of many U.S. police departments. Specifically, I've just donated $1000 toward anti-racist action. If, like me, you've benefited from white privilege and have the means to do so, I invite you to donate to these or similar groups fighting for racial justice.

I have donated $250 each to each of these organizations:

Baltimore Racial Justice Action is “an action-based organization grounded in collective analysis of structural racism and white privilege.” In addition to a supportive community and educational events, BRJA offers consulting and training to individuals and organizations that seek to become inclusive and equitable. Donate here. Contributions are tax-deductible.

The American Civil Liberties Union, which works on the fight for voting rights, against the infuriating school-to-prison pipeline, and on many other racial justice issues. Donate here. Donations to the ACLU are not tax-deductible or employer-matchable; if that matters to you, donate to the ACLU Foundation here.

We the Protesters works to “fulfill the democratic promise of our union, establish true and lasting justice, accord dignity and standing to everyone, center the humanity of oppressed people, promote the brightest future for our children, and secure the blessings of freedom for all black lives.” Donate via the PayPal button at the end of their homepage. Donations are not tax-deductible.

The Equal Justice Initiative works “to reform the criminal justice system, challenge poverty and the legacy of racial injustice, educate the public and policymakers, and create hope in marginalized communities.” Donate here. Donations are tax-deductible and eligible for employer matching.

Giving to any (or all!) of these organizations is a direct way to fight racism and white supremacy in the United States. Guilt is useless. Take action.
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