morning neuroticness and hope

Apr. 26th, 2015 10:41 am
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
This morning as many other mornings. 4 or 5am. I am in so much pain I don't want to move. Then I'm in so much pain I have to move. (repeat several dozen times) Perhaps if I get my neck in just the right position. No maybe some other position. Maybe with the blanket between my ankles and lying on my side. Read a bit. Cat is meowing. Smear some voltaren on my neck and ankles. And wrists and fingers. And knees. Get up and use the bathroom and drink some water and have a plain tylenol. Attempt to placate cat. (Unsuccessful) Fall back asleep. Dream about pain and waking up and go through entire thrashing-around and trying to meditate cycle. Read on kindle, doze off, read, doze.

Wake up and fidget some more. Toe-wiggling and experimental ankle flexes. Feeling that I can't stand the pain in neck and shoulder. I get up and take half a tramadol and a skelaxin (for neck and left foot spasms) and have some decaf tea on the couch and read. Thinking back on times when i had trouble even holding a book. Will it be like that? Is this going to be a day in bed? Have I screwed myself up? Am I going to cry? Will zond7 be mad at me for fucking myself up? Will Moomin be disappointed and find me a very boring person? Why is my neck so stiff from the extremely gentle swimming around, or the plane? Is it part of ankylosing spondilitis? Did I get some sort of disease on vacation? Am I going to miss work? I finally fall asleep for real.

10am. Coffee. More of my book (Journalist and the Murderer, which is excellent.) Feeling cautiously human. I am up. Feel that I can't stand smell of the house. Wash dishes. Sit on couch & sort through unpacking bags. Deep breath! I should not have coffee, not good for me, but it is so nice.

Moomin tells me his opinion of the Three Musketeers (ridiculous thugs, why does everyone think it is so jolly that they go around killing people? everyone in book is an asshole. He keeps laughing in outrage. There is a graphic novel of the book where they don't sound like such jerks. Weird! I agree with him. We make fun of soldiers, chivalry, people with swords, and people who think it's a fun idea to burn down someone's inn just for kicks.)

Moomin has done the laundry. zond7 still asleep (evidence of him having his own late night insomnia is around). I am lying down to rest feeling sore all over but encouraged that I had enough energy to walk around the house and be productive.

Feeling mad urge to try to blog about our entire trip. Too many thoughts! It was all lovely!

But I steadily took painkillers to be able to be active, thus, my suffering now.

Stance has got to be: take the painkillers now, don't go off them, but don't be overactive, either. Activity like cooking or dishwashing or tidying or watering plants, sit on front and back porch, don't try to go out for several more days. Naps crucial.

Goals for this week: get through work days at least to 3pm, get to PT on Wednesday to swim, eat nicely but frugally (no take-out), keep house tidy, be well enough to go to the movies with the kids and zond7 next Saturday. Sub goal of taking very minimal drugs by end of week (ie half a tramadol zero, once, or twice a day).

Must remember to put cat-proofed water and plain tylenol and a tramadol by the bed tonight so I don't go through that horrible cycle of nightmare feeling pain.

Photo circle: last week to send

Apr. 26th, 2015 08:37 am
puzzlement: (Default)
[personal profile] puzzlement
Reminder to participants that your photos should be in the mail by this Thursday, April 30.

Details of the circle are here.

The results are in.

Apr. 24th, 2015 05:41 pm
beable: (yet there's still something in my heart)
[personal profile] beable
Ticky Box needs a hurdy-gurdy.

But seriously folks: Ice cream?

Apr. 23rd, 2015 04:33 pm
beable: (Default)
[personal profile] beable
Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 9


Ok, but seriously: Ice cream?

View Answers

ice cream!
8 (88.9%)

ice cream.
2 (22.2%)

hmmm, ice cream?
2 (22.2%)

coffee
5 (55.6%)

tea
6 (66.7%)

whiskey
6 (66.7%)

port
5 (55.6%)

blueberries
6 (66.7%)

strawberries
4 (44.4%)

saskatoon berries
4 (44.4%)

blackberries
7 (77.8%)

chocolate
6 (66.7%)

ticky box
6 (66.7%)

these are not all discrete options. embrace the power of and!
7 (77.8%)

these are not all discreet options. You can try to eat ice cream and blackberries on the sly but chances are good someone will notice!
6 (66.7%)

yup, definitely too long since you created a poll, huh?
7 (77.8%)

Ambiviolent is scaring my dad. Again.

Apr. 22nd, 2015 03:27 pm
beable: (a cunningly devious plan)
[personal profile] beable
My dad cc'd me on the following e-mail he sent to [livejournal.com profile] ambiviolent:

Thank you for your get well card. You were entirely correct in your assumption that a card portraying a bear would be less scary than a personal visit; this is particularly true for me as we characterize my beloved wife ([personal profile] beable's mom) as a bear.

Unfortunately I saw your return address on the envelope and I immediately became so scared that I was unable to look at or read your thoughtful card. Best wishes.

[personal profile] beable's dad

POSSCON 2015

Apr. 20th, 2015 11:07 am
pleia2: (Default)
[personal profile] pleia2

This past week I had the pleasure of attending POSSCON in the beautiful capital city of South Carolina, Columbia. The great event kicked off with a social at Hickory Tavern, which I arranged to be at by tolerating a tight connection in Charlotte. It all worked out and in spite of generally being really shy at these kind of socials, I found some folks I knew and had a good time. Late in the evening several of us even had the opportunity to meet the Mayor of Columbia who had come down to the event and talk about our work and the importance of open source in the economy today. It’s really great to see that kind of support for open source in a city.

The next morning the conference actually kicked off. Organizer Todd Lewis opened the event and quickly handed things off to Lonnie Emard, the President of IT-oLogy. IT-oLogy is a non-profit that promotes initial and continued learning in technology through events targeting everyone from children in grade school to professionals who are seeking to extend their skill set, more on their About page. As a partner for POSSCON, they were a huge part of the event, even hosting the second day at their offices.

We then heard from aforementioned Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin. A keynote from the city mayor was real treat, taking time out of what I’m sure is a busy schedule showed a clear commitment to building technology in Columbia. It was really inspiring to hear him talk about Columbia, with political support and work from IT-oLogy it sounds like an interesting place to be for building or growing a career in tech. There was then a welcome from Amy Love, the South Carolina Department of Commerce Innovation Director. Talk about local support! Go South Carolina!

The next keynote was from Andy Hunt, who was speaking on “A New Look at Openness” which began with a history of how we’ve progressed with development, from paying for licenses and compilers for proprietary development to the free and open source tool set and their respective licenses we work with today. He talked about how this all progresses into the Internet of Things, where we can now build physical objects and track everything from keys to pets. Today’s world for developers, he argued, is not about inventing but innovating, and he implored the audience to seek out this innovation by using the building blocks of open source as a foundation. In the idea space he proposed 5 steps for innovative thinking:

  1. Gather raw material
  2. Work it
  3. Forget the whole thing
  4. Eureka/My that’s peculiar
  5. Refine and develop
  6. profit!

Directly following the keynote I gave my talk on Tools for Open Source Systems Administration in the Operations/Back End track. It had the themes of many of my previous talks on how the OpenStack Infrastructure team does systems administration in an open source way, but I refocused this talk to be directly about the tools we use to accomplish this as a geographically distributed team across several different companies. The talk went well and I had a great audience, huge thanks to everyone who came out for it, it was a real pleasure to talk with folks throughout the rest of the conference who had questions about specific parts of how we collaborate. Slides from my presentation are here (pdf).

The next talk in the Operations/Back End track was Converged Infrastructure with Sanoid by Jim Salter. With SANOID, he was seeking to bring enterprise-level predictability, minimal downtime and rapid recover to small-to-medium-sized businesses. Using commodity components, from hardware through software, he’s built a system that virtualizes all services and runs on ZFS for Linux to take hourly (by default) snapshots of running systems. When something goes wrong, from a bad upgrade to a LAN infected with a virus, he has the ability to quickly roll users back to the latest snapshot. It also has a system for easily creating on and off-site backups and uses Nagios for monitoring, which is how I learned about aNag, a Nagios client for Android, I’ll have to check it out! I had the opportunity to spend more time with Jim as the conference went on, which included swinging by his booth for a SANOID demo. Slides from his presentation are here.

For lunch they served BBQ. I don’t really care for typical red BBQ sauce, so when I saw a yellow sauce option at the buffet I covered my chicken in that instead. I had discovered South Carolina Mustard BBQ sauce. Amazing stuff. Changed my life. I want more.

After lunch I went to see a talk by Isaac Christofferson on Assembling an Open Source Toolchain to Manage Public, Private and Hybrid Cloud Deployments. With a focus on automation, standardization and repeatability, he walked us through his usage of Packer, Vagrant and Ansible to interface with a variety of different clouds and VMs. I’m also apparently the last systems administrator alive who hadn’t heard of devopsbookmarks.com, but he shared the link and it’s a great site.

The rooms for the talks were spread around a very walkable area in downtown Columbia. I wasn’t sure how I’d feel about this and worried it would be a problem, but with speakers staying on schedule we were afforded a full 15 minutes between talks to switch tracks. The venue I spoke it was in a Hilton, and the next talk I went to was in a bar! It made for quite the enjoyable short walks outside between talks and a diversity in venues that was a lot of fun.

That next talk I went to was Open Source and the Internet of Things presented by Erica Stanley. I had the pleasure of being on a panel with Erica back in October during All Things Open (see here for a great panel recap) so it was really great running into her at this conference as well. Her talk was a deluge of information about the Internet of Things (IoT) and how we can all be makers for it! She went into detail about the technology and ideas behind all kinds of devices, and on slides 41 and 42 she gave a quick tour of hardware and software tools that can be used to build for the IoT. She also went through some of the philosophy, guidelines and challenges for IoT development. Slides from her talk are online here, the wealth of knowledge packed into that slidedeck are definitely worth spending some time with if you’re interested in the topic.

The last pre-keynote talk I went to was by Tarus Balog with a Guide to the Open Source Desktop. A self-confessed former Apple fanboy, he had quite the sense of humor about his past where “everything was white and had an apple on it” and his move to using only open source software. As someone who has been using Linux and friends for almost a decade and a half, I wasn’t at this talk to learn about the tools available, but instead see how a long time Mac user could actually make the transition. It’s also interesting to me as a member of the Ubuntu and Xubuntu projects to see how newcomers view entrance into the world of Linux and how they evaluate and select tools. He walked the audience through the process he used to select a distro and desktop environment and then all the applications: mail, calendar, office suite and more. Of particular interest he showed a preference for Banshee (reminded him of old iTunes), as well as digiKam for managing photos. Accounting-wise he is still tied to Quickbooks, but either runs it under wine or over VNC from a Mac.

The day wound down with a keynote from Jason Hibbets. He wrote The foundation for an open source city and is a Project Manager for opensource.com. His keynote was all about stories, and why it’s important to tell our open source stories. I’ve really been impressed with the development of opensource.com over the past year (disclaimer: I’ve written for them too), they’ve managed to find hundreds of inspirational and beneficial stories of open source adoption from around the world. In this talk he highlighted a few of these, including the work of my friend Charlie Reisinger at Penn Manor and Stu Keroff with students in the Asian Penguins computer club (check out a video from them here). How exciting! The evening wrapped up with an afterparty (I enjoyed a nice Palmetto Amber Ale) and a great speakers and sponsors dinner, huge thanks to the conference staff for putting on such a great event and making us feel so welcome.

The second day of the conference took place across the street from the South Carolina State House at the IT-oLogoy office. The day consisted of workshops, so the sessions were much longer and more involved. But the day also kicked off with a keynote by Bradley Kuhn, who gave a basic level talk on Free Software Licensing: Software Freedom Licensing: What You Must Know. He did a great job offering a balanced view of the licenses available and the importance of selecting one appropriate to your project and team from the beginning.

After the keynote I headed upstairs to learn about OpenNMS from Tarus Balog. I love monitoring, but as a systems administrator and not a network administrator, I’ve mostly been using service-based monitoring tooling and hadn’t really looking into OpenNMS. The workshop was an excellent tour of the basics of the project, including a short history and their current work. He walked us through the basic installation and setup, and some of the configuration changes needed for SNMP and XML-based changes made to various other parts of the infrastructure. He also talked about static and auto-discovery mechanisms for a network, how events and alarms work and details about setting up the notification system effectively. He wrapped up by showing off some interesting graphs and other visualizations that they’re working to bring into the system for individuals in your organization who prefer to see the data presented in less technical format.

The afternoon workshop I attended was put on by Jim Salter and went over Backing up Android using Open Source technologies. This workshop focused on backing up content and not the Android OS itself, but happily for me, that’s what I wanted to back up, as I run stock Android from Google otherwise (easy to install again from a generic source as needed). Now, Google will happily backup all your data, but what if you want to back it up locally and store it on your own system? By using rsync backup for Android, Jim demonstrated how to configure your phone to send backups to Linux, Windows and Mac using ssh+rsync. For Linux at least so far this is a fully open source solution, which I quite like and have started using it at home. The next component makes it automatic, which is where we get into a proprietary bit of software, Llama – Location Profiles. Based on various types of criteria (battery level, location, time, and lots more), Llama allows you to identify criteria of when it runs certain actions, like automatically running rsync to do backups. In all, it was a great and informative workshop and I’m happy to finally have a useful solution to pulling photos and things off my phone periodically without plugging it in and using MTP, which apparently I hate and so never I do it. Slides from Jim’s talk, which also include specific instructions and tools for Windows and Mac are online here.

The conference concluded with Todd Lewis sending more thanks all around. By this time in the day rain was coming down in buckets and there were no taxis to be seen, so I grabbed a ride from Aaron Crosman who I was happy to learn earlier was a local but had come from Philadelphia and we had great Philly tech and city vs. country tech stories to swap.

More of my photos from the event available here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/pleia2/sets/72157651981993941/

Originally published at pleia2's blog. You can comment here or there.

brainwane: Sumana, April 2015, with shaved head. (Default)
[personal profile] brainwane
crossposted from Cogito, Ergo Sumana

screen capture of 'Another Sunday'When Leonard and I lived in the Bay Area and drove south to Bakersfield to see his mom every few months, he got a satellite radio subscription. I'd navigate the music channels and look at the device to see the name of the artist and ask him to guess. When he couldn't tell, he often guessed "REM" (for loud stuff) or "Belle & Sebastian" (for quiet stuff).

Right now I'm working on an ambitious fanvidding project and am thus watching a bunch of other ambitious fanvids (e.g., chaila's "Watershed", danegen's "Around the Bend", counteragent's "Coin Operated Boy") to take notes on technique (e.g., exactly how many 100%-dark frames serve as a good stutter in frightening montages, versus how many blank frames help reset the eye and prepare it for a new sequence). Just now I was watching "Another Sunday" by Jescaflowne, set to "We Built This City" by Jefferson Starship. I checked the timecode scrubber. "Hey Leonard," I said facetiously. "Did you know that rock songs used to be four and a half minutes long?"

He looked at my screen as we made up Freakonomics-worthy nonsensical explanations of why this used to be the case. "What show is that?"

"Stargate Atlantis."

At this, Leonard developed a hypothesis that Stargate Atlantis and Supernatural are like REM and Belle & Sebastian, viz., if he can't tell what fandom a vid is, and there are spaceships and lots of guns, it's SGA, and if there are no spaceships and nearly no guns, it's Supernatural.

As a data point, I've watched zero SGA and one ep of SPN ("Fan Fiction"), but have spent happy hours enjoying fic and vids about both, particularly the critical readings -- if you're waiting for Ann Leckie's next Ancillaryverse installment, you could do worse than reading "Second Verse (Same as the First)" by Friendshipper/Sholio. I wonder whether the same thing will happen to me with Teen Wolf.

Warm in the sun

Apr. 16th, 2015 10:02 pm
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
Such a nice day today. I had meetings all morning from 8am onwards, then went to therapy, bus broke down on the way there and the guy was worried about letting me off into the street, but not a jerk about it. I got off and went to the next stop and all was well on the next bus. Listened to one of the mixes I made recently & played Ingress & looked out the window. So warm in a nice way - a little on the hot side but that feels good to me! I should start wearing sunscreen.

After my appointment I went to look for a replacement scarf for my lost wooly pashmina. The woman running the store and I discussed our strange desires to have every scarf. My new pashmina is silk and cashmere and is a dark rich shiny brown with faint black patterns. Super ideal. I feel like a little brown bird. (In a giant blanket thing, with purple trimmings). Then beetled off to the J, to downtown uneventfully, switched to the N, went up to the roof at work. I sat in the sun overlooking the bay & devoured a stroopwaffel and some of those toasted coconut flakes, dealt with some bugmail, then hung out with support and user advoc. people who were having a beer. Unsurprisingly, support/UA team is NICE.

I tried channeling Lukas a bit by hosting an event at work. the nicest meetup. In retrospect, really, I knew this but just figured I could get away with it, I should have lined up another person to help me host. And, I should have specially invited the facilities people to come and attend so they could see some accessibility barrier negotiation in action. (But really they can just come see me be unable to open the heavy door, any time. ) Around 40-50 people showed up and I met lots of nice people.

After many years of volunteer thingies and doing a lot of work it was nice to just go, Oh, an event shall happen, and magic catering people and an A/V magician show up and do many of the things. The only thing I did was zoom around opening the 2 different doors at the entryways and greeting people. Which was fun except for the door being hard to manage. it was not unpleasant to briefly wield some resources and be a nice host without having to do all the actual physical labor.

I thought how I used to go out and do something like this every week sometimes more than once a week. Increasingly by taking more painkillers. Oh! so exhausting! I just can't do it!

But, it was nice for tonight. also, the food was good. i was just inhaling it. (I wonder if all the asthma meds make me hungrier?? food seems especially satisfying this week) Nice cheese, dried figs, giant slabs of very dense crystalized honey.... those mushroom truffle tarts... wtf, nice.

i am now planning to put in a workplace service request (like facilities) for working with lighthouse to do a tactile map of surrounding area and the building first floor interior. I wonder if this is something that is useful beyond just particular occasion (must ask them -- also, did they keep the julia morgan ballroom one, and did the JM ballroom people know it existed? I should follow up) So, do they keep such things and then print them for people ? Can't believe I never followed up on that....

I am so excited about vacation and our trip. I cannot wait to pack. I'm going to loaf on the beach like nobody's business.
beable: (gonzo journalism)
[personal profile] beable
I came up with these last year on a road trip to a dance event.
However since at Filk Ontario tonight then [livejournal.com profile] decadentdave closed his concert with Barrett's then this seemed like a good time to re-inflict them on the world.


Oh, there's 99 bottles of beer on the wall.
How I wish I was in Sherbrooke now!
We took one down and we passed around,
God damn them all!

I was told we'd sail the seas for a bottle of rum,
We'd fire no guns. Take 1 down, & pass it around,
There's 98 bottles on a Halifax pier
thorfinn: <user name="seedy_girl"> and <user name="thorfinn"> (Default)
[personal profile] thorfinn
Here's a thought about Intellectual Property (movies, photos, books, music, writing, software, patents, etc), and licensing, and why it's all such a mess.

Intangible things of any kind are hard to understand to begin with. Intellectual Property is intangible. Then IP laws are meta IP about IP. Then IP licenses (the things that let you legally use IP) are themselves IP that operate in the context of IP laws.

It's seriously no wonder that people don't understand, and quite reasonably don't even want to understand, Intellectual Property licenses in pretty much any context you like. They're several levels of intangible meta away from even the first level of the intangibility.

And I didn't even mention jurisdictional issues. Ugh.

Really everyone just wants to make cool stuff and maybe make a living out of it. But the legal side of it is actually a giant complicated mess of intangible stuff that almost nobody cares about.

So if you're ever wondering about "Apple vs Samsung", or "Patent trolls", or "creative commons", or "open source" licenses, and why it all seems like it's a horrible mess... Well, yeah. It's not simple. It never will be. :-/ That kinda sucks.

Wednesday 15 April 2015

Apr. 16th, 2015 04:55 pm
puzzlement: (jelly)
[personal profile] puzzlement
Originally posted at http://puzzling.org.

So many things about travel are only things I remember when I travel. Which is a shame, because some of those things I forget when not traveling are bad things about travel and I wouldn’t spend so much of the rest of my time puttering around being all “why am I so mysteriously averse to traveling? how strange!” Sure, I never forget the things about airports and aircraft being hostile to all things normal and human, I remember my three continuous days of insomnia after getting home from Romania in 2007, things like that. But that’s physical discomfort. I forget the emotions. I don’t remember the defensiveness of wanting to spend multiple consecutive days in dark hotel rooms (probably culture shock), I don’t remember the constant loneliness that nicely counterbalances that so that I’m unhappy even in the hotel rooms and I don’t remember the homesickness on top of it all.

I don’t remember the punch in the gut of “almost everything I love best in the world is somewhere else entirely”.

These memories obviously brought to you by being in San Francisco rather than Sydney right now. How else would I be accessing them? And you shouldn’t think of this as an unusual trip for me, this is pretty much every damn time. Not non-stop of course, or I probably would remember better why I have mixed feelings about travel. No. It’s an acute problem and I’m right in the target zone for it: more than halfway done with the travel, mostly done with the reason for the travel, why can’t I go home now?

As I’ve been telling people, last Thursday night was my first night away from A, ever. That Friday night through to this coming Monday night were/will be the second through twelfth nights, respectively. So that’s not helping either. Apparently she’s been pretty fine with it, which is in character. She doesn’t mind when we get babysitters, she doesn’t mind being dropped at daycare, it turns out she doesn’t noticeably mind that I vanished a week ago and that a couple of days later, V vanished too. (He’s gone to visit my parents.) C’est la vie?

On the bright side, I’ve finally been to Montreal! Which is actually part of this whole sad pattern too: I get this way worse when I travel as far as the US East Coast, or Europe, than I do otherwise. But still, I’ve finally been to Montreal! I didn’t really understand their seasons until I was flying in and I noticed that the waterways were still iced up, which I have never actually seen before anywhere, let alone anywhere in the middle of spring. I didn’t leave the city, but I did go and specifically look right at the river at Vieux Port. The ice was pretty slushy but it was extensive. I went to Notre Dame, which I wouldn’t have chosen for myself but am happy about; I wasn’t aware of the French Catholic history of Montreal and the cathedral is beautiful.

I was very Australian about the temperature, which is to say, it was above freezing, so why wear a coat? I run very hot in any case, even other Australians regularly look at my outfits and say “but aren’t you cold?” However by Monday, it was 22°C anyway (up from about -5 the week before) so I didn’t have to shock everyone for long. There was definitely much less ice visible on the way out.

Australian or not, I will admit that walking in the rain on Friday when it was about 3° and I had left my raincoat, conscientiously lugged all the way from Australia, in Outremont was a bit of a challenge.

I was there for PyCon and AdaCamp. The former confirmed that if I want to go to PyCon, some day I just need to go to PyCon and stop thinking that I can go on a work trip and actually attend the conference too. A number of people I know were very surprised to hear I was there given that they didn’t see me at all, and probably some more will be surprised when they read this. I have a more reasonable approach to AdaCamp: I can attend some of it and I do, and it is much as I picture.

I’m in San Francisco now. I think five hours or so is the worst length of flight. Long enough that I spend about four hours thinking “OK, surely we’re nearly there” and checking out the flight map to find out that nope, we are in no way nearly there, short enough that there’s no institutionalisation to the plane environment. Just non-stop outrage the whole way. Plus no one feels sorry for you afterwards, unlike my Sydney to Vancouver to Montreal itinerary which caused some appreciative intake of breath from Montrealers.

Four more nights.

a good swim

Apr. 15th, 2015 03:30 pm
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
I had a decent swim today at PT. My ankles did not feel strong but I could do all the things. I had a nice 10 minutes of lying in the sun beforehand on a park bench and nearly fell asleep. On the way there past the zoo I stopped to watch two brown bears playing in their pool. Today's class was 4 dudes, one of the ditzier ladies, and a nice woman who talked about her marriage and her new (old) Impala and going to casinos. She is a bus driver. Sadly she thought I was in my early 20s. Right..... No! There was a guy there with a new back injury who was very tense and upset. I felt for him. He was wishing that he could just be in the water all the time since then he would be "walking like a normal person again". I did not break it to him that he was still wincing and limping and looking kind of fucked up in the water. I hung out more with the guy with the prison tattoos who is pretty nice, and the Impala lady, who told us all about the beached whale in Pacifica and the last 4 or 5 times there has been a beached whale in the area.

Asthma still nasty. I think that there is nearby road construction and that is what's doing it. Pulse oximeter thing going from 95-98. Inhalers rule. Even if they make you get the shakes.

I am well into this not very good series of fake Jane Austen novels where Elizabeth and Darcy go to all the different settings for Austen's other novels. The writing style and things that happen are not at all right. But they are not super super awful enough that I've stopped reading them, either. Everything else on my Kindle (and it is full of stuff) is sort of serious or dense. Need trashy reading!

Hugo mess continues, very annoying. I read a short story that was withdrawn from the awards. It wasn't very good. Nothing to barf about, it was just boring and as if it were churned out to make $25 or fill up magazine pages 40 or 50 years ago and it would not have done anything new then either. I then thought of all the novels that are basically that same story but stretched out to make more pages, and just as boring. How can people be so dull?!

I also read a pleasingly cranky review of Silver on the Tree, a book that has always annoyed me.

A. wore lip gloss to school today for "twin day" along with black tshirts with horses on them with 3 of her friends. Oddly... she just got home and she is wheezing.

Nightmares

Apr. 15th, 2015 08:09 am
badgerbag: (Default)
[personal profile] badgerbag
Nightmares about pain. That was weird. My hands do hurt but not like in the dream.
puzzlement: (jelly)
[personal profile] puzzlement
Originally posted at http://puzzling.org.

I’m in San Francisco from tomorrow (Wednesday) until Sunday! Most of the trip is a work trip, but I have figured out that I can make use of my Double Union membership when I’m in town and have fun, chill events in the space.

Double Union event: Button-making & crafts with Mary Gardiner

Mary Gardiner, our Australian member and a co-founder of the Ada Initiative, will be visiting San Francisco and wants to use our button-maker! Come make buttons and do assorted crafts (vinyl-cutter, 3D printer, sewing, etc.) and hang out with Mary and Valerie!

When: Sat Apr 18, 2015 6:00pm – 8:00pm

Where: Double Union on Valencia Street between 14th Street and 15th Street. See the visitor information.

This is open to Double Union members. It’s also open to non-Double Union members who are my friends!

For my friends

If you are not a Double Union member, and we’re friends, please email me at my personal address to let me know you’re coming. People of all genders welcome.

Please read the Double Union visitor information and the anti-harassment policy if you are coming along.

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